Porsche Taycan Turbo

2020 Porsche Taycan 4s

Porsche Taycan Turbo feedback

The 1st electric car that may seriously challenge the Tesla Model S in performance, eligibility and usability is here. The Porsche Taycan is everything we would expect from Porsche’s first EV. Here is a car with ‘just’ 523bhp in its most basic 4S form, or 617bhp and 774lb-ft as a Turbo S. More than 200 miles of range can be done, even if you’re walking. Additionally, it charges in half the time of a Tesla Model S (with some caveats, natch) and debuts Porsche’s most technically beautiful interior design so far. A significant factor, after that.

Porsche’s battery technology

It’s easy to get satisfied with electrical performance cars. They all manage to offer the same combination of a whacking excellent battery, two motors and approximately a million foot-pounds of torque provided by the fall of a hat.

The Taycan mainly uses this brief with one key divergence: an 800-volt power supply, which is double, which is generally used in electric cars. Porsche tried this technology in the Le Mans successful 919 Hybrid race car. Nobody else is presently providing this.

Alright, so what? Well, by increasing the voltage, you can drop the present without affecting power output. Lower present means thin cables, which in this case shaves about 4 kilograms from the loom. Most of all, though, it enables quicker charging times, however, a tripping block for electric cars.

In perfect conditions, the Taycan has a maximum charging capability of 270kW, which means you may pump 62 miles into the 93.4kWh battery in only 5 minutes, or change from 5 to 80% in just 22.4 min. It’s not simple as that, though, and we will get upon why later.

Porsche Taycan Ev

All of this juice powers two electric motors (one on each axle, meaning all-wheel drive) that Porsche describes as ‘permanently excited,’ just like a kid on Haribo, or the state of the motoring press because this car was exposed. It is related to magnets.

Eventually, the Taycan includes an exclusive two-speed transmission on the rear axle (the front uses a much more standard one-speed planetary gear), which means huge speed off the line and improved efficiency while cruising.

How fast is it?

Sorry, however, it is quite hard work making cutting edge electric car engineering sound since interesting as a unique smooth 6. What’s more comfortable translating into extra deep conditions is the dramatic result of all that nerdgasm technology has whenever you press the accelerator pedal.

1st gear, as explained previously, is mainly within Sport or Sport Plus driving modes, significantly when you activate Launch Control. This is when the 2 (current) Taycan models change most the Turbo with its 671bhp cracks 0-62 mile per hour in 3.3 seconds, and the 751 horsepower Turbo S in 2.9 secs.

That’s quick definitely, but not, Ludicrously fast. The real difference between this and a Tesla states Porsche is that the Taycan can do this repeatedly before the fragile organic mass behind the wheel has had enough.

Porsche Taycan Electric

But see, you’re not going to do repetitive launch starts (until you’re a motoring journalist on a lunch break; therefore, this ability is about A Porsche showing and B) putting a related figure on the Taycan’s sheer depth of performance.

The idea is that if it can perform those 2.9 second runs repeatedly, it’ll have no problem at all increasing from the Stelvio Pass’s consecutive hairpins, for example. You wouldn’t use each last horse in like a Ferrari 812 Superfast’s V12 you pay all that money to learn they’ll never run out, and it’s the same here. It’s about reserves.

What’s more useful and exciting in real life is the 626 lbs or 774 lbs-ft of torque you get (depending on the model), which punches the Taycan forwards with the kind of vitality usually reserved for fighter pilots being catapulted off an aircraft carrier. You place your foot down and quickly get yourself somewhere else. There’s no turbo fall or waiting for the torque curve or any of that rubbish, just huge, retina detaching throttle reaction.

Although, there is a similar old story with every electric car, isn’t it? A Renault Zoe may get other drivers out with its off-puttingly silent straight-line performance, but they all break apart the moment you are trying to get that big battery mass to turn into a corner.

Porsche Taycan Nurburgring

However, this is a Porsche, so it’s different, right?

Yes and no – it’s not always quiet for a start because there’s a unique engine noise generator (such as the one in the Jaguar I-Pace) available for racier modes. It doesn’t sound like a Mezger however does, as a minimum, give you a sense of what’s going on.

To handle that curb weight, Stuttgart has thrown its complete collection of framework technology at the Taycan. Still, it’s not reinventing the wheel; these are all things we’ve experienced just before, such as all-wheel drive, torque vectoring, adaptable dampers, backside wheel steering and electro-mechanical roll stabilization. And these types all communicate with each other using Porsche’s 4D Framework Control to avoid inconsistent inputs.

Hardware involves aluminum double wishbones at the start and an aluminum multilink backside, plus three-chamber air suspension that may be raised to avoid speed bumps or lowered in 2 stages to boost grip and aero high speed.

Everything can be changed in Sport Chrono cars using the now typical steering wheel installed drive mode selector, taking you by settings called Range, Normal, Sport and Sport Plus, plus an Individual configuration. Porsche says these provide the option between long-distance shifting and high precision managing, and we agree.

Regardless of the big performance on tap, the Taycan is wonderful to waft around in the 0.22cd drag coefficient makes this the slipperiest Porsche ever, thanks to active aero and air suspension that may lower the car in 2 stages, and that indicates it’s quiet on a cruise. The Turbo with its smaller tires is better than the noisier Turbo S in this case, and this rides far better also.